ain’t – comment l’utiliser

Please note that ‘ain’t’ isn’t exclusively American English, as is commonly believed. The writer Charles Dickens (British, 19th century) put the word ‘ain’t’ regularly into the mouths of his characters, many of whom were working-class Londoners (Cockney).

“Any man may be in good spirits and good temper when he’s well dressed. There ain’t much credit in that.”

After watching the video try correcting these ‘bad’ sentences:

1. I ain’t got none.
2. she ain’t going to work
3. John ain’t happy
4. I ain’t gonna help you
5. They ain’t got no money
6. Ain’t she coming?
7. I’d like some tea, but there ain’t no sugar

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1. I ain’t got none. – I haven’t got any / I don’t have any
2. she ain’t going to work – She isn’t going to work
3. John ain’t happy – John isn’t happy
4. I ain’t gonna help you – I’m not going to help you
5. They ain’t got no money – They haven’t got any money/ They don’t have any money/they have no money
6. Ain’t she coming? – Isn’t she coming?
7. I’d like some tea, but there ain’t no sugar – there’s no sugar/there isn’t any sugar

You might like to try this exercise on ‘some’ and ‘any’. Sorry, there are no explanations on this page, just an exercise.

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