Your and You’re, Jai Alai

Romeo is talking about jai alai. He says, “You’re scooping, you’re passing, you’re trying to get a goal.” He uses the contraction you’re.

Even though you’re and your sound the same, they mean two very different things.

You’re is a contraction of “you are,” as in “You’re cute” (or “You are cute”). Contractions combine two words and usually use an apostrophe (’). Contractions like you’re are very common in spoken English.

When Romeo says, “You’re scooping, you’re passing, you’re trying to get a goal,” he uses the contraction you’re as part of the present progressive tense. He could also say, “You are scooping, you are passing, you are trying to get a goal.”

Your is a possessive adjective. It describes a noun by telling us to whom it belongs, as in, “I love your new dress!” (The dress belongs to you.) Other possessive adjectives are: my, his, her, their, and our.

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