Tag Archives: american english

Get to : be able to (American English)

Here is yet another use of the word ‘get’. Although its use in this context is probably of American origin, British and other natives have adopted it, and you will hear it wherever English is spoken.

Chanson: Scarlett Johansson, Pete Yorn – Relator

When I met you,
I didn’t know what to do. I was tired,
I was hungry,
I fight.

Now I’m away,
I write home everyday and I see you on the TV at night.
(Chorus)
You can see that life’s for us to talk about.
You can leave whenever you want out.
Whoa. You don’t relate to me,
no girl,
you don’t respect me,
no girl,
no girl. Oh yeah.

When I met you,
I didn’t know what to do,
but I noticed that I didn’t really feel.
Now you’re away,
you write home everyday. I don’t beg,
I don’t borrow,
I steal.
(Chorus)
You don’t think that life’s for us to talk about.
You can leave whenever you want out,
you want out. Well,
you don’t relate to me,
no girl. You don’t respect me,
no girl. (you can leave when ever you want out)
And you don’t relate to me,
no girl. And you don’t respect me,
no girl. (You can leave whenever you want out)
No you don’t relate to me,
no girl. And you don’t respect me,
no girl. No girl. Yeah.

American English: ‘I want out’

The expression ‘I want out’ means ‘I want to stop doing this’ ‘I want to get out of this situation’ or ‘I want to abandon (give up) it’

It is common in American English, and not much used in the UK.

It is not a ‘phrasal verb’. The word ‘out’ has become in this expression a noun, meaning ‘an exit’ ‘a way out’.

You can hear this expression in the song by Scarlett Johansson, ‘Relator’