Tag Archives: question

How do you like…?

I feel that the question ‘how do you like’ is more common in American English? In British English, although we do use it, we often say ‘what do you think of’ or if it’s an offer, ‘how would you like’

How do you like living in the United States?
=
What do you think about living in the United States?

combien de temps mettez-vous…? How Long…

Real English is a registered trademark of the Marzio School

How long does it take to go to work? – Combien de temps mettez-vous pour aller au travail?

anglais facile cours d’anglais gratuits

EF cours debutants : poser des questions

What’s it like to live in New York? – Il est comment de vivre à New York?

Prenez l’habitude d’employer les réponses courtes: c’est toujours avec l’auxiliaire, et non le verbe (sauf être)

Do you like New York? – Yes I do / No I’m not
Are you going out tonight? – Yes I am / No I’m not
Have you finished yet? – Yes I have / No I haven’t
Can you stop that? – Yes I can / No I can’t

Questions – direct and indirect

A direct question is like this:

where is the station?

or

What time is it?

Indirect questions are more polite, they start with things like, ‘do you know if’ ‘savez-vous si’ or ‘could you tell me’ pourriez-vous me dire

Pay attention to word order, you can’t use the same structure as a direct question:

Could you tell me where the station is?

Do you know what time it is?

Exercice:

Transformez les questions suivantes en questions indirectes:

exemple:

what does the shop open? – could you tell me what time the shop opens?

1. Where is the nearest postbox? Do you know ________________________________ ?

2. What time did he leave? Do you know ___________________________ ?

3. Is the doctor available? Could you tell me __________________________ ?

4. Do I need to book in advance? Could you tell me ______________________ ?

5. How much does this cost? Could you tell me _______________________________ ?

réponses plus bas:

1. Where is the nearest postbox? Do you know where the nearest postbox is?

2. What time did he leave? Do you know what time he left?

3. Is the doctor available? Could you tell me if the doctor is available?

4. Do I need to book in advance? Could you tell me if I need to book in advance?

5. How much does this cost? Could you tell me how much this costs?

use of auxiliaries in questions

When the question is the subject, there is no auxiliary verb:

Who went to the cinema?

NOT who did go to the cinema?

when the question is not the subject, we need to use an auxiliary:

Who did you go to the cinema with?

NOT who you went with? – the subject is ‘you’.