Tag Archives: sentence stress

Sentence stress in English

Ces deux phrases vont vous montrer comment les anglophones “avalent” leur mots! Bon courage…

articulation practice: the house that Jack built

Practise slowly and speed up gradually. Notice how the narrator pronounces the important words, but ‘swallows’ (avaler) the little ‘grammatical’ words like ‘the’ and ‘that’.

this is the house that jack built

this is the malt
that lay in the house that jack built

this is the rat
that ate the malt
that lay in the house that jack built

this is the cat
that killed the rat
that ate the malt
that lay in the house that jack built

this is the dog
that worried the cat
that killed the rat
that ate the malt
that lay in the house that jack built

this is the cow with the crumpled horn
that tossed the dog
that worried the cat
that killed the rat
that ate the malt
that lay in the house that jack built

this the maiden all folorn
that milked the cow with the crumpled horn
that tossed the dog
that worried the cat
that killed the rat
that ate the malt
that lay in the house that jack built

this is the man all tattered and torn
that kissed the maiden all folorn
that milked the cow with the crumpled horn
that tossed the dog
that worried the cat
that killed the rat
that ate the malt
that lay in the house that jack built

this is the priest all shaven and shorn
that married the man all tattered and torn
that kissed the maiden all folorn
that milked the cow with the crumpled horn
that tossed the dog
that worried the cat
that killed the rat
that ate the malt
that lay in the house that jack built

This is the cock that crowed in the morn
that waked the priest all shaven and shorn
that married the man all tattered and torn
that kissed the maiden all folorn
that milked the cow with the crumpled horn
that tossed the dog
that worried the cat
that killed the rat
that ate the malt
that lay in the house that jack built

this is the farmer sowing his corn
that kept the cock that crowed in the morn
that waked the priest all shaven and shorn
that married the man all tattered and torn
that kissed the maiden all folorn
that milked the cow with the crumpled horn
that tossed the dog
that worried the cat
that killed the rat
that ate the malt
that lay in the house that jack built

Prononciation anglaise: articulation, rhythm and rhyme

I believe that language is like music, and even if you know all the words, it doesn’t mean that you can sing the song, right? when you sing, you sing with rhythm, when you speak, you should also speak with rhythm.

In this lesson, I’m going to share a children’s rhyme, or as we say, a nursery rhyme (comptine). Through the rhyme, I hope that you get a stronger feel for the rhythm of the English language. Now this is a rhyme that most Americans know, it’s called, ‘Hey Diddle Diddle’.

To help you understand, I’m going to show a family quilt (quette) – it’s been in my family for fifty years. So you look at the pictures, and I’ll say the rhyme.

Hey diddle diddle the cat and the fiddle
The cow jumped over the moon
The little dog laughed to see such sport
And the dish ran away with the spoon.